Indie = Psychedelia

Indie = Psychedelia in 2018

by Peter Marchant

In 2014 I was introduced to my friend’s new boyfriend who was a massive fan of ‘psych’ music, especially one band in particular: ‘The Brian Jonestown Massacre’. I had played guitar in ‘indie’ and ‘pop’ bands for my entire performing life and yet I somehow managed to miss this strange term. However, four years on and I am now fronting an outfit that I can categorically say is a ‘psych’ band (short for Psychedelic Rock or Pop by the way).
It turns out that this was a genre that I had been into for years without even realising it. The Beatles, Oasis, Kasabian, MGMT…these were all bands that I loved and simply considered to be Rock or Indie bands. My new friend encouraged me to delve deeper into his Spotify playlist and into the fuzzed out, reverby world of psychedelic rock.
2018 is a crucial time for this ‘macro-genre’ (as I call it) as we are seeing more bands than ever who would have previously been considered all-out indie now playing very ‘spacey’ and ethereal sounding music, strongly influenced by artists of the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Indie = Psychedelia

Indie = Psychedelia

A perfect example of this is Arctic Monkeys, whose album ‘Tranquility Base Hotel and Casino’ was released on the day I wrote this. As a guitarist, one of the first things that you notice when the needle drops on this record is that there is hardly any guitar…or so it seems. The guitar is used, but sparingly. When there is guitar it’s never a conventional crunchy, twangy Fender Stratocaster sound that is so closely associated with their first two albums. For example, towards the end of the first track ‘Star Treatment’ a guitar part (finally) comes in, which acts like a call and response with the ‘Beach Boys sounding, palm muted, melodic and guitar-like’ bassline. The effect on this guitar part is more accurately described as a subtle ‘fuzz’ sound more than a crunch or distortion, with a clipping characteristic that is typical of tape saturation. Even the chord progression in this section of the song is classic psychedelia. The chord progression Cm to F repeating is reminiscent of that used in Pink Floyd’s ‘Great Gig in the Sky’ when that famous vocal solo kicks in (the chords being Gm to C repeating). A far cry from their days of playing ‘I Bet You Look Good On The Dancefloor’ in 2006. See what spaced out inspiration lies in the more recent music of those indie bands of days gone by.
Other examples: The Coral – ‘Sweet Release’, Foals – ‘What Went Down’, Gaz Coombes (formerly of Supergrass) – ‘Walk The Walk’, Phantom Isle – ‘Focus’ (my band!)

Indie = Psychedelia in 2018

Camden Guitar Academy NW1 London

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Guitar Lessons Camden. Whether you simply want to have fun, want to start a band, are determined to take your playing to the next level, are preparing for an audition, or want to become a professional musician, the Camden Guitar lesson program is the place for you. Programs are available for all skill levels, from beginner to advanced.

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Guitar Lessons Camden – Camden Guitar Academy NW1 London

Kickstart your guitar playing today .Camden is a great place to be a musician with many opportunities to join bands, entertain in local venues.Guitar Lessons Camden teach Guitar, Bass And Ukulele Lessons In Camden London. Friendly Expert Teachers Offer Guitar Lessons At Your Home In Camden London NW1.

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Camden Guitar Academy Camden Guitar School

 

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Guitar Lessons Hornsey Finsbury Park Haringey

Guitar Teacher hornsey, finsbury park, crouch end, muswell hill, highgate, haringey

Guitar Lessons hornsey, finsbury park, crouch end, muswell hill, highgate & haringey. Guitar lessons with experienced and talented music teachers in the comfort and convenience of your home.

Guitar Lessons Hornsey Finsbury Park  Haringey

Guitar Lessons Hornsey Finsbury Park Haringey

Here at guitar lessons London we have a relationship led ethos  based on motivation, encouragement & enjoyment. Guitar Lessons with fun, enthusiastic, and motivating teachers, discover the rich and rewarding experience of private music lessons all over London. We guarantee you will find an instructor that is conveniently located and suits your skill level. Our instructors work with guitar students of all ages, skill levels, and are happy to travel to YOU.

Guitar Lessons Hornsey Finsbury Park Haringey

Guitar Lessons Hornsey Finsbury Park Haringey

 

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1981 MusicMan 75 Head 2100

Repair Log: 1981 MusicMan 75 Head 2100 – 75 EX SN: xxxxxxx 23/06/18 Copyright retained Terry Relph-Knight RRP in 1980 $445 Value today - £ 200 Supplied with a 1M Fender speaker jack cable. This MusicMan head is a hybrid transistor / valve design, rated at 75...

Guitar Lessons in Whetstone Guitar Lessons Whetstone believes that music is a powerful influence in everyone’s life. Our Mission is to provide our fantastic students with a great musical experience that leads to personal enrichment that will stay with them throughout their...

Mark Knopfler Sultans of Swing

Mastering the Pentatonic Article 4 - Mark Knopfler; “Sultans of Swing”, adding the 2nd, and flirting with Harmonic Minor. The Pentatonic Scale is the...

1988 Black Gibson 335 semi-hollow electric guitar

Repair Log: 1988 Black Gibson 335 semi-hollow electric guitar SN Repair Log: 1988 Black Gibson 335 semi-hollow electric guitar SN: xxxxxxxx   23/06/18 Copyright retained Terry Relph-Knight Supplied in a tan Gibson hard case. Made in the Gibson...

Why middle C

Why middle C? By Terry Relph-Knight, copyright retained 03/06/18 Most people will have heard of middle C, but apart from knowing it is a musical note somewhere around the middle of the piano keyboard, won’t know it’s significance. Why C? Why middle?

Mixolydian and the minor Pentatonic

Mixolydian and the minor Pentatonic When faced with improvising over a dominant seventh chord...

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Guitar Lessons Camden Town

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WELCOME TO NW1 GUITAR LESSONS

Here at guitar lessons , our job is to give you a teaching experience that fits your needs. Our  method of teaching is based on over 20 years of playing guitar as well as extensive research in the art of teaching. Start you guitar lessons in Camden TODAY!

Camden Guitar Teachers | Camden Guitar Lessons | guitar lessons in Camden

Camden Guitar Teachers | Camden Guitar Lessons | guitar lessons in Camden

Guitar Lessons in Camden Town.

London Guitar Academy had the honor of working with thousands of fantastic students, from beginners to advanced guitar players, and we feel confident and passionate in our approach to your success! Together we’ll learn how to play your favorite songs, learn techniques that will improve your overall playing skills, and give you the information to help you learn on your own as well. Take lessons with LGA through private lessons, group lessons, or skype.

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Guitar Lessons Camden Town

Guitar Lessons Camden Town

Wonderful teachers who adjusts to your needs and forms collaborative goals. Is very knowledgeable and knows how to break things down to make them understandable. Will go back in the future to continue on with more lessons!

Great Guitar Albums Oasis Definitely Maybe

THE MOMENT: DEFINITELY MAYBE

LGA pupil Kyran walks us through Great Guitar UK Guitar Albums kicking off with the supersonic first album by Oasis Definitely Maybe.

Oasis Definitely Maybe

There are moments for every music lover where a certain album or song changes the course of your life, whether it is discovering the Beatles from your grandparents, or the moment after an adolescent heartbreak you hear Morrissey groan “Please, please let me get what I want” and it all begins to make sense.

Whatever your moment is, it is at that point we decide how we will dress, speak and act. There are of course can be more than one. My first ‘moment’ was falling in love with Definitely Maybe.

Great Guitar Albums Oasis Definitely Maybe

Great Guitar Albums Oasis Definitely Maybe

Specifically the first time I heard Live Forever. I remember watching the music video: The 16 bar drum intro comes in as the camera focused on Liam Gallagher, sat on a chair suspended high on a wall, my imagination was captured. The video ends with Noel Gallagher burying soon to be ex drummer Tony McCarroll in a garden. I had two thoughts; I need to learn how to play guitar and get myself an Adidas Firebird jacket (I still have the one I bought of EBay at the age of 13).

The album is a fantastic bit of work that fully embodies what it means to be youthful, optimistic and truly captures that energy. Definitely Maybe wears its influences very much on its sleeve, the melodic chord structures of every song allude to a songwriter in Noel Gallagher who clearly worshipped at the alter of The Beatles, hints of The Stooges and Sex Pistols guitar sound run through tracks like Bring it on Down and Rock n Roll Star and even tracks like Shakermaker or up in the Sky would not have been out of place on a Kinks album circa the Village Green era or a psychedelic 60’s compilation.

The production behind the album is unique, according to producer Owen Morris; he was the first person to pioneer a method of mixing called “Brick walling”. This method involves the use of a box causing sound compression of the initial track (it causes the hiss at the beginning of Cigarettes and Alcohol) and is then mixed to be on the red line on the mixing desk. Morris is very adamant about the effect this had “ that first year in jukeboxes around the country Oasis came on louder than anyone else”.

The recording of the album was not smooth sailing, twice the album was scraped, the first version was recorded in Mono Valley, Wales and the second attempt saw Noel Gallagher and sound engineer Mark Coyle try to mix and produce the record. The issues surrounding the record were primarily to do with the sound and the initial sessions didn’t capture the energy and sound that make up the Oasis sound. The best example is the early recording of Slide Away (It can be found on YouTube), while beautiful it doesn’t quite carry the energy that the final album mix would.

I could go on and on about this album but finally I want to point at how special the album is lyrically. Live Forever contains my favourite lyric on any song “we’ll see things they’ll never see”. This lyric perfectly summarises a special relationship. Even on a song like ‘Digsy’s Dinner’ which lyrically overall isn’t fantastic, it still includes a fantastic line “These could be the best days of our lives”.

The album will always hold a special place in British music for many people but for many like me, it is “the moment”, whatever your moment or moments, they are incredibly special. Whether you agree with my choice, no doubt you will be able to identify with a similar album that made you fall in love with music.

Haringay Crouch End Finsbury Park Islington Guitar Lessons

Guitar Lessons Haringay Crouch End Finsbury Park Islington

London Guitar Academy’s Sean Kelly takes care of home visit guitar lessons for us in North London. Sean covers Archway, Haringay, Crouch End, Finsbury Park, Islington and Hackney.

Guitar Lessons Haringay Crouch End Finsbury Park Islington

Guitar Lessons Haringay Crouch End Finsbury Park Islington

Sean’s a professional, experienced, enthusiastic and versatile guitar  teacher. We guarantee brilliant first class guitar lessons that are scheduled and taught specifically for your personal requirements. Specialist Private Guitar Lessons for beginners who need the first and basic skills to really start playing guitar. From tuning and holding a guitar.
The most modern and understandable guitar program to play a song! Home visit guitar lessons all over North London including Crouch End, Finsbury Park, Islington, Archway, Haringay and Muswell Hill!

Haringay Crouch End Finsbury Park Islington Guitar Lessons

Haringay Crouch End Finsbury Park Islington Guitar Lessons

 

London Guitar School -Guitar Teachers in London - Guitar Lessons London‎

Guitar Teachers in London – Guitar Lessons London‎ – Guitar Lessons in London 

Guitar Lessons London offers fun, stimulating music lessons for kids and adults, and to all levels of interest and ability. Whether you’re just starting out on acoustic guitar, electric guitar or electric bass, or have been at it for years and want to explore new styles and techniques, London Guitar Academy is the best choice in London forprofessional, one to one guitar lessons in London.

Guitar Hub

Guitar Hub

 

At Guitar Lessons London, your musical taste is the doorway to learning or enhancing your craft and understanding of music theory and song structure. With an emphasis on the work of rock icons like Oasis,U2,The Beatles, Jimi Hendrix, Led Zeppelin, AC/DC, Eric Clapton, Green Day, The Red Hot Chili Peppers, Jack Johnson, The Eagles, The Police, Metallica, Van Halen, The Rolling Stones, Deep Purple, and Bob Dylan, Guitar Lessons London also provides lessons in all popular musical styles, including  blues, jazz, folk, classical and more.

 

RHYTHM GUITAR EXAMPLE

Rhythm guitar is a technique and role that performs a combination of two functions: to provide all or part of therhythmic pulse in conjunction with singers or other instruments; and to provide all or part of the harmony, i.e. thechords, where a chord is a group of notes played together. Therefore, the basic technique of rhythm guitar is to hold down a series of chords with the fretting hand while strumming rhythmically with the other hand. More developed rhythm techniques include arpeggiosdampingriffschord solos, and complex strums.

In ensembles or “bands” playing within the acousticcountrybluesrock or metal genres (among others), a guitarist playing the rhythm part of a composition plays the role of supporting the melodic lines and solos played on the lead instrument or instruments, be they string, brass, wind, keyboard or even percussion instruments, or simply the human voice, in the sense of playing steadily throughout the piece, whereas lead instruments and singers switch between carrying the main or counter melody and falling silent. In big band music, the guitarist is considered part of the rhythm section, alongside bass and drums.

In some musical situations, such as a solo singer-guitarist, the guitar accompaniment provides all the rhythmic drive; in large ensembles it may be only a small part (perhaps one element in a polyrhythm). Likewise, rhythm guitar can supply all of the harmonic input to a singer-guitarist or small band, but in ensembles that have other harmony instruments (such askeyboards) or vocal harmonists, its harmonic input will be less important

In the most commercially available and consumed genres, electric guitars tend to dominate their acoustic cousins in both the recording studio and the live venue. However the acoustic guitar remains a popular choice in countrywestern and especially bluegrass music, and almost exclusively in folk music.

Contents

Rock and pop

Rock and pop rhythms

Most rhythms in rock and blues are based on 4/4 time with a backbeat; however, many variations are possible. A backbeat, is a syncopated accentuation on the “off” beat. In a simple 4/4 rhythm these are beats 2 and 4.[2] Emphasized back beat, a feature of some African styles, defined rhythm and blues recordings in the late 1940s and so became one of the defining characteristics of rock and roll and much of contemporary popular music.

Rock and pop harmony

Harmonically, in rock music, the most common way to construct chord progressions is to play “triads“, each comprising a root, third and fifth note of a given scale, interspersed four-note chords, which include the sixth, seventh or ninth note of the scale. Three-chord progressions are common in earlier pop and rock, using various combinations of the IIVand V chords, with the twelve-bar blues being particularly common. Minor and modal chord progressions feature in later popular music.

Arpeggios

One departure from the basic strummed chord technique is to play arpeggios, i.e. to play individual notes in a chord separately. If this is done rapidly enough, listeners will still hear the sequence as harmony rather than melody. Arpeggiation is often used in folk and country, sometimes in imitation of older banjo technique. It is also prominent in 1960s pop, such as The Animal‘s “House of the Rising Sun“, and jangle pop from the 1980s onwards. Rhythm guitarists who use arpeggio often favor semi-acoustic guitars and twelve string guitars to get bright, undistorted “jangly” sound.

The famous Soukous band TPOK Jazz additionally featured the unique role of mi-solo, (meaning “half solo”) guitarist, playing arpeggio patterns and filling a role “between” the lead and rhythm guitars.[3]

Riffs

In some cases, the chord progression is implied with a simplified sequence of two or three notes, sometimes called a “riff“, that is repeated throughout the composition. In heavy metal (or just “metal”) music, this is typically expanded to more complex sequences comprising a combination of chords, single notes and palm muting. The rhythm guitar part in compositions performed by more technically oriented bands often include riffs employing complex lead guitar techniques. In some genres, especially metal, the audio signal from the rhythm guitar’s output is often subsequently heavily distorted by overdriving the guitar’s amplifier to create a thicker, “crunchier” sound for the palm-muted rhythms.

Interaction with other guitarists

In bands with two or more guitarists, the guitarists may exchange or even duplicate roles for different songs or different sections within a song. In those with a single guitarist, the guitarist may play lead and rhythm at different times or simultaneously, by overlaying the rhythm sequence with a lead line.

Replacing lead guitar

Some rhythm techniques cross over into lead guitar playing.

In guitar-bass-and-drums power trios guitarists must double up between rhythm and lead. For instance Jimi Hendrix combined full chords with solo licksdouble stops andarpeggios.

The Pirates, when they established themselves in 1962-64 and again from 1976 onwards as a separate, power trio entity from Johnny Kidd & the Pirates, were pioneers of the technique of playing guitar solos with a thick chordal rhythm-guitar-like style, which was later popularised by Wilko Johnson of Dr. Feelgood in the 1970s.

A recent innovation is the use of a “looping pedal” to record a chord sequence or riff over which the lead line can then be played, simulating the sound achieved by having two guitarists.

Equipment

Rhythm guitarists usually aim to generate a stronger rhythmic and chordal sound, in contrast to the lead guitarists’ goal of producing a sustained, high-pitched melody line that can be heard over top of the band. As a result, rhythm and lead players may use different guitars and amplifiers. Rhythm guitarists may employ an electric acoustic guitar or ahumbucker-equipped electric guitar for a richer and fatter output. Also, rhythm guitarists may use strings of a larger gauge than those used by lead guitarists. However, while these may be practices, they are not necessarily the rule and is subject to the style of the song and the preference of the individual guitarist.

While rhythm guitarists in metal bands use distortion effects, they tend to use less of the modulation effects such as flangers used by lead guitar players. Whereas the lead guitarist in a metal band is trying to make their solo tone more prominent, and thus uses a range of colorful effects, the rhythm guitarist is typically trying to provide a thick, solid supporting sound that blends in with the overall sound of the group. In alternative rock and post punk bands, though, where the band is trying to create an ambient soundscape rather than an aggressive Motörhead-style “Wall of Sound“, the rhythm guitarist may use flanging and delay effects to create a shimmering background.

Jazz

The rhythmic aspect of rhythm guitar is generally much less important in jazz than in, for instance, rock or pop. On the other hand, jazz guitarists are expected to have deep knowledge of harmony.

Jazz harmony

Jazz guitarists use their knowledge of harmony and jazz theory to create jazz chord “voicings,” which emphasize the 3rd and 7th notes of the chord. Some more sophisticated chord voicings also include the 9th, 11th, and 13th notes of the chord. In some modern jazz styles, dominant 7th chords in a tune may contain altered 9ths (either flattened by a semitone, which is called a “flat 9th”, or sharpened by a semitone, which is called a “sharp 9th”); 11ths (sharpened by a semitone, which is called a “sharp 11th”); 13ths (typically flattened by a semitone, which is called a “flat 13th”).

Jazz guitarists need to learn about a range of different chords, including major 7thmajor 6thminor 7thminor/major 7thdominant 7thdiminishedhalf-diminished, and augmented chords. As well, they need to learn about chord transformations (e.g., altered chords, such as “alt dominant chords” described above), chord substitutions, and re-harmonization techniques. Some jazz guitarists use their knowledge of jazz scales and chords to provide a walking bass-style accompaniment.

Jazz guitarists learn to perform these chords over the range of different chord progressions used in jazz, such as the II-V-I progression, the jazz-style blues progression, the minor jazz-style blues form, the “rhythm changes” progression, and the variety of chord progressions used in jazz ballads, and jazz standards. Guitarists may also learn to use the chord types, strumming styles, and effects pedals (e.g., chorus effect or fuzzbox) used in 1970s-era jazz-Latin, jazz-funk, and jazz-rock fusion music.

Big band rhythm

In jazz big bands, popular during the 30s and 40s, the guitarist is considered an integral part of the rhythm section (guitar, drums and bass). They usually played a regular four chords to the bar, although an amount of harmonic improvisation is possible. Freddie Green, guitarist in the Count Basie orchestra, was a noted exponent this style. The harmonies are often minimal; for instance, the root note is often omitted on the assumption that it will be supplied by the bassist.

Small group comping

When jazz guitarists play chords underneath a song’s melody or another musician’s solo improvisations, it is called “comping“, short for “accompanying” and for “complementing”.[citation needed] The accompanying style in most jazz styles differs from the way chordal instruments accompany in many popular styles of music. In many popular styles of music, such as rock and pop, the rhythm guitarist usually performs the chords in rhythmic fashion which sets out the beat or groove of a tune. In contrast, in many modern jazz styles within smaller, the guitarist plays much more sparsely, intermingling periodic chords and delicate voicings into pauses in the melody or solo, and using periods of silence. Jazz guitarists commonly use a wide variety of inversions when comping, rather than only using standard voicings.[4]

Gypsy pumping

La Pompe.[5] About this sound Play (help·info)

Gypsy jazz is acoustic music which usually played without a drummer. Rhythm guitar in gypsy jazz uses a special form of strummingknown as “la pompe“, i.e. “the pump”. This form of percussive rhythm is similar to the “boom-chick” in bluegrass styles; it is what gives the music its fast swinging feeling. The strumming hand, which never touches the top of the guitar, must make a quick up-down strum followed by a down strum. The up-down part of la pompe must be done extremely fast, regardless of the tempo of the music. It is very similar to a grace note in classical music, albeit the fact that an entire chord is used. This pattern is usually played in unison by two or more guitarists in the rhythm section.

Jazz chord soloing

Jazz guitar soloists are not limited to playing single notes by their instrument. This allows them to create “chord solos” by adding the song’s melody on top of the chord voicings.Wes Montgomery was noted for playing successive choruses in single notes, octaves and finally a chord solo. This technique differs from chord-melody soloing in that it is not intended to be used unaccompanied

Funk

Vamp riff typical of funk and R&B.[6] About this sound Play (help·info)

Funk utilized the same extended chords found in bebop jazz, such as minor chords with added sevenths and elevenths, or dominant seventh chords with altered ninths. However, unlike bebop jazz, with its complex, rapid-fire chord changes, funk virtually abandoned chord changes, creating static single chordvamps with little harmonic movement, but with a complex and driving rhythmic feel. Some of the best known and most skilful soloists in funk have jazz backgrounds. The chords used in funk songs typically imply a dorian or mixolydian mode, as opposed to the major or natural minor tonalities of most popular music. Melodic content was derived by mixing these modes with the blues scale. .

In funk bands, guitarists typically play in a percussive style, often using the wah-wah sound effect and muting the notes in their riffs to create a percussive sound. Guitarist Ernie Isley of The Isley Brothers andEddie Hazel of Funkadelic were notably influenced by Jimi Hendrix‘s improvised solos. Eddie Hazel, who worked with George Clinton, is one of the most notable guitar soloists in funk. Ernie Isley was tutored at an early age by Jimi Hendrix himself, when he was a part of The Isley Brothers backing band and lived in the attic temporarily at the Isleys’ household. Jimmy Nolen and Phelps Collins are famous funk rhythm guitarists who both worked with James Brown.

Reggae

Reggae downstroke pattern[7]About this sound Play (help·info).

The guitar in reggae usually plays the chords on beats two and four, a musical figure known as skank or the ‘bang’. It has a very dampened, short and scratchy chop sound, almost like a percussion instrument. Sometimes a double chop is used when the guitar still plays the off beats, but also plays the following 8th beats on the up-stroke. An example is the intro to “Stir It Up” by The Wailers. Artist and producer Derrick Harriott says, “What happened was the musical thing was real widespread, but only among a certain sort of people. It was always a down-town thing, but more than just hearing the music. The equipment was so powerful and the vibe so strong that we feel it.” [8]

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