Pedal Board Build

Build Log: Pedal board build 

Terry Relph-Knight copyright reserved.

The commission for this guitar effects pedal board build was to build a fairly compact, rugged and portable effects board based around effects pedals the client already owned and regularly used. Both the sequence of effects connections and the layout was to be optimised without the physical order limiting the connection order.  

A Pedaltrain Pro Junior was chosen for the base, being both light and strong and available with a tough nylon carry case. Nine volt power is provided by a small and economically priced switching supply, the Diago Powerstation. Rather than rely on plugging the mains power lead into the small two pin figure of eight connector on the side of the Diago, the mains lead from the Diago was wired to a standard 3 pin IEC connector, mounted on a bracket at the back of the Pedaltrain base. Nine volt power distribution is via a 6 way Diago daisy chain cable. For the original board layout with seven pedals the seventh power connection was provided by an extra cable that plugged in to the auxiliary power output on the back of the BOSS Chromatic Tuner. 

Build Log: Pedal board build

The pedals were attached to the Pedaltrain base using conventional hook and loop self adhesive Velcro with the hook tape fitted to the Pedaltrain and the loop tape to the pedals.

The only pedal modification was to the VOX Wah Wah. This pedal had been previously restored – cleaned, pedal polished, base re-painted and a new control pot fitted. For use on this pedal board it was fitted with an external 2.1mm power jack, having previously been battery only.

Pedal connection order

Pedal Board Build

Pedal Board Build

Right to left – Guitar in to ….

Crowther Audio Hot cake …………….. white to Tuner in

VOX Wah-wah ……………………….. green to Tremolo in

BOSS Chromatic Tuner TU-2 ………… blue to Compressor in

BOSS Compression Sustainer CS-2 ….. black to Wah in

BOSS Tremolo TR-2 …………………. yellow to Delay mono in

BOSS Digital Delay DD-6 …………… red from mono out to Reverb in

Electro Harmonix Holy Grail Nano Reverb …. to amp

Hot cake eventually replaced by BYOC Tube Screamer and Boost

Diago Powerstation 9V switching power supply

Pedal board components and costs

Pedaltrain Pro Junior frame & soft case                 £86.99

Diago Powerstation 9V switching power supply £61.88

9V power extension cable £05.50

Postage returning the faulty Powerstation £04.10

Patch cables £04.99

1 x IEC mains cable £05.00

IEC socket and custom mounting plate £03.90

Cable tie bases £05.00

£177.36

10/02/18 In for a clean up 

As received –

Guitar to Uber Scream Tuba

Tuba to BOSS Tuner

Tuner to Cali 76 compressor

Compressor to Viscous Vibe

Vibe to EP Booster

Booster to BOSS DD6 Delay

Delay to Holy Grail Reverb

Reverb to amp

Delivered with the VOX Wah to be restored to the board.

The Hot Cake is an always on buffer pedal. With the Hot Cake missing the pedal chain is no longer fed from a buffered signal. It seems the BOSS TU-2 may also have an always on buffer.

New connection order

Guitar to Tuner

BOSS Tuner to EP Booster

Booster to Uber Scream Tuba

Tuba to Cali 76 compressor

Compressor to Wah Wah

Wah Wah to Viscous Vibe

Vibe to BOSS DD6 Delay

Delay to Holy Grail Reverb

Reverb to amp

Fender Custom Shop 51 Nocaster Repair Log

Repair Log:  30th of July 2010 SN:NCxx Fender Custom Shop Limited Edition ‘51 Nocaster made by Fender in Corona USA

Guitar Repair. Hello and thank you for visiting our Guitar Repairs London page. Please feel free to check out some of our guitar repair logs below. We are meticulous with our guitar, amp & effects repairs and catalogue all our repairs. We produce a full range of Guitar Tech services to keep your instrument in perfect health including restrings, setups, electrical work and parts replacement. If you need anything relating to you guitar fixing please contact us here at London Guitar Repairs today to find the perfect solution for requirements. Our pro Guitar repairs and luthier services are by experienced Guitar Techs, we specialise in bespoke guitar and amp repairs including servicing, re-strings, setups, re-frets, refinishing, neck resets & vintage guitar repair. With over 30 years combined experience, our guitar techs have been trusted to work on the guitars of some of the most elite guitar players in the country and around the world.

Copyright reserved Terry Relph-Knight 01/10/17

Current value – Can be found on offer for £1,700. Purchased from Wunjo’s for £2,000.

Delivered with a rectangular cream and maroon Fender Custom Shop hard case, including a custom shop certificate and other documentation.

Strung 10 to 52 Ernie Ball STHB

 

Fender Custom Shop 51 Nocaster Repair Log

Fender Custom Shop 51 Nocaster Repair Log

Description – A Fender black guard Custom Shop replica of a 1951 ‘Nocaster’ Telecaster, reliced with all slot screws.

Body – Light swamp ash body in the traditional blond finish. Relic wear under the forearm and around the back edge. The black 5 hole pick guard does indeed appear to be made of a thin (0.0625 inch 1/16) sheet of un-bevelled phenolic material and the top surface is lacquered to make it look blacker and shinier. A small area below the top E string has been rubbed away to simulate playing wear.

Neck – One piece, fat soft V, maple neck with a walnut skunk stripe. Wear through on the lacquer up to the eight fret. 21 thin vintage frets. Headstock carries only the script Fender logo in silver with black outline,  Fender Custom Shop V logo on the reverse.

Repair Log Fender Custom Shop 51 Nocaster

Hardware – Kluson style tuners. A single round string tree next to the G tuner. Custom Alnico 3 Tele pickups (bridge pickup has flat magnets). Nickel plated folded thin sheet steel bridge with three brass barrel saddles, 4-40 height screws?. Through body stringing with flat ferrules. Four bolt, chrome plated steel neck plate stamped with the NC77 serial LIMITED EDITION and the Fender Custom Shop V logo. Standard Tele control plate with a three way switch and solid nickel plated brass flat top (slight edge radius) knurled knobs. All cloth wired. Tone and volume controls are modern CTS pots. Unfortunately these pots have no stress relief clip, the pot shaft slides in the collar and is only held in place by the locating post into the middle of the steel clip on cover.

This guitar as shipped from the Custom Shop was originally wired to the ‘51 Nocaster schematic with a 15K (wired between neck and middle on one half of the switch and an 0.05uF cap (wired from the other half of the switch – neck terminal – to ground). These components have been removed and the guitar re-wired to modern Tele wiring by a previous owner.

The original ‘51s had no variable tone control. The wiring offered –

Neck pickup with a set bassy sound (no variable tone control)

Neck pickup with no tone control at all

Both pickups with the second rotary control acting as a blend for the bridge.

The neck pickup has the North of the magnet poles up and the bridge has the South up. The pickups do seem to be arranged for hum cancellation in the middle position.

Centre saddle low E to middle 12 fret 327mm, 325mm high E. 257mm front edge of bridge to middle 12fret. Bridge plate is 3 3/8” long.

Problems – Brought in for noise (hum) and a loose output jack. Guitar occasionally produces loud crackles and hums. Seems related to the tone control.

Work done –

Tightened up the nuts on all the controls, on the switch and on the output jack. Dabbed on some clear nail varnish to help lock the output jack nut in place. Replaced one of the rusted ‘reliced’ pickup screws with a clean screw. Re-bent the cover tabs on the tone controls loose cover, shifted the output jack ground over to the back of the volume control where all the other circuit grounds are. Sleeved the long bare wire on the tone cap. Placed an M3 nut inside the Tone knob as a spacer to stop it scraping on the control plate. Replaced the missing switch tip with a barrel tip (the original barrel tip was included in the case, but the slot for the switch arm was so gouged out that it would no longer fit securely).

Having removed the strings in order to lift the bridge I removed the saddles, sanded them down to remove old string notches and soaked all the screws and springs in WD40 to remove dirt and rust. Also cleaned the bridge plate. With the saddles re-assembled and replaced on the bridge plate I set up the action and intonation.

Diagnostics – Loose output jack. Missing switch tip. Pot nuts are loose. Control plate screws loose.

A quick fret rocker test shows fret 8 is high in the middle and one or two other frets further down the neck are a touch high. Fret surfaces look as though they have been levelled fairly recently, but not re-crowned.

A continuity test showed that the bridge plate and strings weren’t connected to ground. Removing the strings and lifting the bridge plate revealed that the ground jumper between the pickup ground lead tag and its elevator plate was intact. It turns out that all three reliced bridge pickup screws were so rusty they no longer made an electrical connection between the pickup elevator plate and the bridge.

Input jack tip contact seems slack, jacks don’t make a positive insertion. Ground lead from tone cap (cap added by previous owner when the guitar was re-wired to modern wiring) is not sleeved and runs over the top of the volume wiper where it could short out.

The tone control seems loose and repeatedly rotating it fully anti-clockwise often produces loud crackles and hums. Looking closely the steel back cover is loose on its four folding tabs. Ridiculously, the only ground return for the output jack is through a black cloth covered wire that is soldered to the back of this cover. With the tabs to the cover being loose the output jack ground has only a very sketchy and intermittent connection to the guitars circuit ground. Perhaps the 1950’s pots had more reliable connection to ground from the cover, the pots in this guitar are of course modern CTS pots. CTS do seem to have changed to using a thinner, softer steel for the pot casing and the fixing tabs are quite easily loosened through down pressure on the pot shaft.

Along with the bad ground connection to the bridge plate the grounding scheme seems very poor. Fender may have been intending to exactly copy a ‘51 Nocaster, (the Fender shop wiring drawings do show this as how the ground was wired) but in the process they seem to have done some really daft things.

Screws – American guitars have either 4-40 or 6-32 saddle height adjustment screws. The first number indicates diameter and larger numbers greater diameter. The second number indicates thread count – 40 is more per inch than 32.

4-40 is 0.112 inch clearance

6-32 is 0.138 inch clearance

4-40 are smaller screws found in Strat saddles.

So 6-32 is the larger size found in the early Tele 3 saddle bridges.

My DeTemple titanium 3 saddle Tele set has ½ inch long screws in the centre and 3/8 long on the two outside saddles. My Rutters is 3/8 and 5/16.

Bridges like the Wilkinson are metric and use M3 screws. They seem to be all 10mm long.

Parts

Black barrel switch tip.

Further work – 20/12/17

The original slot head saddle grub screws stick up and are sharp and uncomfortable under the palm of the right hand. I replaced the original screws (six 7/16” long 6-32 slot head) with two stainless steel 1/4” long 6-32 hex head screws for the high and low E strings and four stainless steel 3/8” long 6-32 hex head screws for the other four strings (1/16” hex key for adjustment).

London Guitar Academy

The London Guitar Academy is London’s only dedicated Rock Pop and Blues guitar school specialising in one to one guitar tuition in either electric or acoustic guitar.

Each lesson is tailored to suit each students individual taste and ability; offering a fresh and innovative approach to learning the guitar.

London guitar lessons, Guitar Lessons in LondonGuitar Lessons London, london guitar school, London guitar academy, guitar lessons Queens Park, Guitar Tuition, guitar lessons nw london, guitar course, Beginners guitar lessons, guitar lessons, guitar lessons london, Notting hill guitar school,music school, bass lessons, guitar teacher, Play guitar

 


Newsletter Sign up